Posts Tagged ‘grieving process’

The ‘O’ Word that Hits Grievers—and What to Do about It

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

lines of pencils, check boxes beside each, heart in middle

This one should be pretty easy to figure out.  The ‘O’ word that hits grievers is a common reaction to grief.  (more…)

Which Best Describes Your Approach to Grief — a Cheetah, a Turtle, or an Ant?

Wednesday, October 16th, 2013

closeup of cheetah, your approach to grief, do you run

Stop for a minute and think about your approach to grief. Do you face it like a cheetah, a turtle, or an ant?

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When Was the Last Time You Laughed?

Friday, March 2nd, 2012

bulldog wearing pink organdy collar and sporting an 'attitude'When was the last time you laughed—especially uncontrollably? If you’re somewhere in the grieving process, you probably think this is an unusual question, maybe even inappropriate. Keep reading!

Laughter is a “healing” escape. Research has confirmed the powerful medicinal effects of laughter. It truly is a miracle drug! And how many ‘drugs’ today have no negative side effects? Laughter produces only positive effects—on both the mind and the body! Laughter even helps to fight disease.

Have you noticed in your own experience that positive and negative responses cannot occupy the same space? If you’re giggling, can you stay mad or upset? How many times have you been angry with someone, and they kept teasing you until you smiled or laughed? When you couldn’t keep from smiling (no matter how hard you tried) didn’t your mood change?

I understand that at times during grief, especially early on, you won’t be able to laugh. And please know that I am not disrespecting or disregarding the grieving process. It’s crucial. However, everyone needs breathing space from grief. Otherwise, it’s too overwhelming.

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What Is the Widespread Misunderstanding about Grief?

Thursday, February 23rd, 2012

smooth polished stone heart lying among shells on the beachMisunderstanding about grief is common. Just talk to people, if you can get them to talk about it. People generally don’t want to discuss grief until they’re faced with it in their own lives—or in the life of someone they know.

A key misconception is that grief will finally just go away on its own. This mistaken idea goes right along with the one we’ve all heard: “Time heals all wounds.” Neither is true.

All loss results in grief—but the process to reach healing is a choice each person has to make. We choose whether to face our grief or try to ignore or bury it. Every person eventually chooses whether to be a victor or a victim.

I don’t want to mislead you. At first, grief is all-consuming, and the pain is overwhelming. You’ll be in a state of shock and feel numb. Some describe this feeling as being ‘in a fog.’

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Seeking Help with Grief Is Not a Sign of Weakness — but an Act of Courage!

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Horse taking a stand in a field of yellow flowersGrief is a vulnerable time — and it’s easy to be swayed by guilt. We think we should be stronger than we feel and more self-sufficient than we are. When we don’t live up to our own expectations, let alone anyone else’s, we feel guilty and incapable. Before we realize what’s happening, we can fall into a negative downward spiral when we’re under such pressure.

Treat yourself gently when you’re facing grief! The grieving process may be the hardest thing you  have ever done. And when you’re tempted to be too hard on yourself, remember what you’re going through.

No one should try to face grief alone.

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